COBRE Center for Neuroscience

Some years ago, Dr. Melissa Harrington (Professor of Biology at Delaware State University) had a vision to enhance diversity in biomedical sciences. Delaware State University is a historically-black college comprised of many first generation African-American students attending college. Creating programs to encourage students at the undergraduate and graduate level to participate in research makes a difference here. Dr. Melissa Harrington and her colleagues have been committed to creating and growing programs that encourage students to participate in research. She, and her colleagues, have created a PhD program in Neuroscience, an undergraduate neuroscience summer program, and an NIH-funded COBRE program at Delaware State University. The COBRE is a cross-institutional NIH-funded program designed to expand the research infrastructure of Delaware and increase diversity in biomedical sciences. This is achieved, in part, by hiring junior faculty at Delaware State University and the University of Delaware. The COBRE center for Neuroscience is led by Melissa. Learn more about Melissa's long-term enterprise to make a difference here.

    Melissa Harrington, PhD 

            Professor, Department of Biology at Delaware State University.

Dr. Harrington acquired her PhD at Yale studying molecular and neurophysiology. Dr. Harrington did great work... Please insert your bio here. Any photos below the page?

Participating faculty at the COBRE Center for Neuroscience 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Christine Charvet, PhD 

            Assistant Professor, Center for Neuroscience at Delaware State University.

Dr. Charvet acquired postdoctoral training in neuroimaging at Harvard Medical School and statistical genetics at Cornell University. Her research program leverages big data in genetics and neuroimaging to address fundamental questions in developmental and comparative neuroscience while providing practical applications to the biomedical community. For example, Dr. Charvet and her colleagues developed a resource with which to find corresponding ages across humans and model organisms (http://translatingtime.org). This resource is often used by researchers who study model organisms (e.g., mice) and need to translate their findings to humans. Dr. Charvet has received multiple grants from the NIH and NSF. In addition, she and has published 33 articles in her field. We are excited Dr. Charvet joined in the Fall of 2018 to enhance the research infrastructure of Delaware and increase diversity in biomedical sciences. You can learn more at https://www.charvetlab.com. Check out some of the Charvet lab's recent work:

Diffusion MR tracrography is one of the very few tools available to study structural connections in the human brain. Yet, the tractography is sometimes uncertain. We have not been able to map the structural connector of the human brain. Check out this easy to read review to understand why the integration of state of the art diffusion MR imaging with transcriptomics moves us forward in mapping the human brain connectome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo please 

    Janeese Bronlow, PhD 

            Assistant Professor, Center for Neuroscience at Delaware State University.

Janeese did great stuff. Please insert bio here. any photos relevant below? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo please

   Miki Li, PhD 

            Assistant Professor, Department of Biology at Delaware State University.

Miki did some great work. Please add bio here? Maybe some photos below?

 

 

 

 

 

Photo!

 

   Michael Gitcho, PhD 

             Professor, Department of Biology at Delaware State University.

Mike did some great work. Please add bio here? Maybe some photos below?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo please

    Jarid Goodman, PhD 

            Assistant Professor, Center for Neuroscience at Delaware State University.

Janeese did great stuff. 

© 2020 by Charvet Laboratory For Developmental Neuroscience

Contact: charvetcj@gmail.com